Understanding Form 1099

If you earn interest, sell an investment or receive dividends or other types of non-employee-related payments from a business, you will receive a Form 1099, which is used for . Financial institutions must provide a Form 1099 by the end of January. (The information is also reported to the Internal Revenue Service.) If you haven't received a Form 1099 by February, call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040.

There are over a dozen types of Form 1099. For example, a 1099-DIV reports investment dividends and distributions, while a 1099-S reports proceeds from real estate transactions. Many people receive a 1099-INT, which reports interest income. That’s our focus here.

1099 form

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The information on this website is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.

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